Preventing Cockroaches The Safer Way

Why Boric acid kills roaches?

What is Boric Acid?

Boric acid is a combination of water and boron, which takes the form of powder. Boric acid is a naturally-occurring compound found in fruits and plants. While this mix is highly toxic to cockroaches, it is relatively harmless to humans and pets. You can make boric acid yourself or buy it from local stores and even Amazon.com.

The most prominent drawback to boric acid is that, when misapplied, its effectiveness is greatly diminished and can result in a mess. The powder is best applied to an area where cockroaches are likely to walk through it. Don’t use too much boric powder in one place, as cockroaches will avoid it if they see it. Remember: you’re trying to trick them into walking through it.

 

How Does Boric Acid Kill Roaches?

As soon as the boric acid powder touches the body of the roach, the tiny particles stick onto it and some of it gets absorbed through the roach’s greasy outer body covering. As the roach preens and cleans its body it will also ingest some of the powder. The mineral and crystalline qualities of the boric acid then begin to damage the exoskeleton of the roach from the outside, and cause dehydration from the inside. Once they have been affected by the boric acid, cockroaches will start to behave abnormally in that they will come out into the daylight in exposed areas, rather than keeping to darkened places and staying against the walls.

How Long Will it Take to Get Rid of Roaches With Boric Acid?

After an adult roach has come into contact with boric acid it would take approximately seventy-two hours for it to die. Nymphs and juveniles would usually die in a shorter time, within about twenty-four to forty-eight hours. The roaches will return to their nesting areas and carry the powder with them thus infecting others. Roaches also tend to be cannibalistic, so they will feed on their dead, thus spreading the toxic effect further. Boric acid is deadly for all types, sizes and ages of cockroach, regardless of the species with which you dealing.  This is what makes boric acid for roaches one of the most effective methods of elimination.

 

How to use boric acid to create and and termite traps

Boric acid can effectively kill ants. Simply combine 1/8 teaspoons of powdered boric acid with 1/2 teaspoon of honey, pour the concoction into a few bottle caps, then place the caps in the path of where you’ve been seeing ants. Ants will bring this toxic mixture back to their nest and spread it around the colony, effectively killing many ants. Be sure to retrieve the boric acid ant traps afterwards and carefully wipe down the area where they were left.

To get rid of termites using boric acid, mix four tablespoons of grape jelly, three tablespoons of canned cat food, and one tablespoon of boric acid for a quick and effective termite solution. Place a pinch of this recipe into any area you think termites might be nesting — once again, preferably in a small container such as a bottle cap that allows for easy cleanup. Hopefully, the workers will bring this mixture to feed the queen and offspring (much like ants), and the boric acid will go to work.

 

How to Make a Boric Acid Spray

Boric acid is a naturally occurring chemical compound containing the element boron. It is found in soil, plants, rocks and water. This versatile compound offers a host of home and garden uses, including as an insecticide, as a weedkiller and in household mold remediation. Boric acid is available for purchase in a crystalline powder form, and it may be mixed into a solution for simple application. Boric acid in powder or liquid form is a toxic substance for humans and pets when ingested, inhaled or absorbed through the skin, and it always should be handled with care.

  • Mix boric acid powder, sugar and water to create a boric acid insecticide spray. Use 2 tablespoons of boric acid and 2 cups of sugar for every 1 cup of water. The sugar will attract insect pests, including ants and cockroaches, while the soluble boric acid will kill them. Wear protective gloves each time you mix the boric acid solution because it is toxic.
  • Dissolve boric acid powder in warm water to make your own weedkiller spray. Put on protective gloves. Mix 10 ounces of boric acid powder into 1/2 cup of warm water, and stir the mixture until all the powder is dissolved. Dilute the mixture in 2 1/2 gallons of water to kill creeping charlie (Glechoma hederacea) and other common weeds
  • Combine 1 cup of boric acid powder with 1 gallon of water, while wearing protective gloves, to create a boric acid spray to remove mold from your home. Wear protective gloves, safety glasses and a respirator when in close proximity to mold spores.

Heavy Infestation Help

  • Double the effort by combining 50/50 boric acid and brown sugar then pour the mixture in a thick line around the entire room and entrance ways. The roaches will get the stuff on their bodies and carry it back to the nest. Once there is no trace of the pest left (usually within the month), vacuum up the powder.
  • Sprinkling Diatomaceous Earth is another good option. It’s a natural insecticide that works by scratching an insect’s body as it crawls through it. This powder then absorbs water from the host body and the insect then dies of dehydration. Lightly sprinkle it in hot spots where you notice activity.

Keep the bait away from children and pets. If you have little ones running around, tuck the balls behind furniture, large appliances and inside cupboards